Could El Nino Return This Summer?

Could El Nino Return This Summer?

Rumors of ol’ El returning for summer 2017 have been percolating through meteorological echo chambers for the past few months, but in the past few days, mainstream media outlets like the New York Times have spilled the beans to the bourgeoisie and proletariat alike, alerting Americans of all walks of life that another El Nino may be in store for summer 2017. As a forecaster, it’s always a bit risky to go sounding the El Nino alarms in spring due…

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Warmest Day Of The Year Tomorrow!

Warmest Day Of The Year Tomorrow!

After such a cold, snowy winter and the strongest April windstorm in the Portland metro area since April 14, 1957, I’m sure many of you will be relieved to hear that tomorrow is shaping up to be the warmest day of the year! It’s a far cry from the mutant heat wave we saw last April, but the way this winter and spring have gone, I don’t think we can afford to be too greedy. Tomorrow won’t be particularly sunny,…

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The Showers and Sunbreaks of Spring

The Showers and Sunbreaks of Spring

I have a somewhat bad habit of overusing alliteration in my titles and posts, and this post marks the second consecutive post I’ve made a tongue-twisting title revolving around spring. But when you realize how many weather words begin with the letter s… supercell, sleet/snow/slush, all the stratus clouds, and even Sharknados 1-4 (rumor has it there’s a 5th slated for summer ’17), it’s hard not to get a little carried away. The Pacific Northwest is famous for its seemingly never-ending…

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A Surprisingly Strong Springtime Storm

A Surprisingly Strong Springtime Storm

Hi everybody, I’m back after a brief break from blogging! I’ve been working like mad on finding out how to automatically upload some of the model charts I’ve created to the internet, and I broke new ground today and finally did it! This means that now, you’ll be able to view some of the latest model data on WeatherTogether. Granted, the collection of charts I have right now is rather miniscule, and it will likely stay that way for the…

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A Wet Week Ahead

A Wet Week Ahead

Hi everybody! I apologize for the delay in posts over the past several days – I have been working very hard on my Grads scripts and have been trying to figure out how to get them online! For those who don’t know, Grads is a programming language used to plotted gridded datasets such as those output by weather models. Although I still have a lot to learn, I’ve been making good progress and hope to have some of these charts…

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Does The Equinox Have Equal Lengths of Day and Night?

Does The Equinox Have Equal Lengths of Day and Night?

After a long and dark Pacific Northwest winter, even the biggest storm and snow fans look forward to the longer days of spring. And perhaps no day is anticipated more than the spring equinox, which is, astronomically speaking, the first day of spring. Yet, one of the biggest misconceptions in modern civilization has to be the idea that an equinox has equal lengths of day and night. It’s easy to see why – after all, “equinox” is Latin for “equal night,” and…

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The First Robin Of Spring

The First Robin Of Spring

Yesterday evening, while biking to work (I work night shifts at my weather job), I heard the first robin in many months! The first chirp from a robin has traditionally been associated with the beginning of spring.  This is apparent in two famous 19th century poems: Emily Dickinson’s “I Dreaded That First Robin So,” a depressing piece about spring being yet another season in the inevitable march towards mortality, and William H Drummond’s “The First Robin,” a far more cheerful…

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Trump Administration Proposes Massive Cuts To NOAA

Trump Administration Proposes Massive Cuts To NOAA

On Friday, the Washington Post published an article concerning a memo drafted by the Office of Management and Budget for the 2018 fiscal year. This memo proposed drastic cuts to NOAA that would lead to a 18% reduction in current funding. At a time when U.S. numerical weather prediction is falling behind the rest of the world, satellites are approaching the end of their lifespans, and many local NWS offices are already overworked and understaffed, this is the very last thing…

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March: A Surprisingly Snowy Month For The Mountains

March: A Surprisingly Snowy Month For The Mountains

Not many people know that March, on average, is nearly as snowy as February for most of the Cascades and Olympics. Snoqualmie Pass, for example, averages 72 inches for February vs 71.7 inches for March. Yes, March does have an unfair advantage in terms of length, but with days rapidly becoming longer, storms becoming weaker, and the famous cold east-pass flow becoming much less of a factor as the Columbia Basin warms, how is it that March and February are…

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An Overview Of Seattle’s Crazy Snowstorm!

An Overview Of Seattle’s Crazy Snowstorm!

Before I explain Seattle’s crazy weather on Monday, I must apologize for not keeping you updated on the situation throughout the day and night! Since I’ve moved down to Portland, I’ve definitely been more out-of-touch with Seattle weather. Still, that’s no excuse for at least writing a post-storm blog about the insane and unexpected thundersnow that Seattle saw! On Monday, two convergence zones formed over the Central Puget Sound area, one in the early morning and one in the afternoon….

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